Narnia

Turkish Delight Bars – A Narnia Recipe

Since starting this blog, I have tried and failed multiple times to make Turkish delight. I won’t even tell you how many times. All of my attempts have come out absolutely inedible, and definitely not worthy of sharing with anyone! I knew I couldn’t give up, though, because what’s a Fantasy food blog without Turkish delight, am I right?

Turkish Delight Bars - A Narnia Recipe

So, I figured instead of trying to make authentic Turkish delight, I’d instead make a dessert inspired by Turkish delight. I got to thinking, what desserts do I enjoy that have a gooey texture and are covered in powdered sugar? Then it hit me: lemon bars! I love lemon bars, and I knew that with a few changes I could turn them into Turkish delight bars, so here we are! I made a few changes to this lemon bar recipe from I Am Baker to come up with my Turkish delight bar recipe, and I think it turned out great!

Next time you’re looking for a magical dessert or treat, I hope you consider making some Turkish delight bars inspired by The Chronicles of Narnia.

Turkish Delight Bars – A Narnia Recipe

Ingredients

For the Crust

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cup flour

For the Filling:

  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons flour
  • 4 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 to 3 drops rosewater (optional)
  • 1 to 2 drops red food coloring (optional)
  • Powdered sugar for dusting

Directions

  1. Mix together the ingredients for the crust, and press into the bottom of a greased 8 x 8 baking pan.
  2. Bake the crust at 350 degrees F for 15 minutes.
  3. Mix together the filling ingredients and pour over the crust.
  4. Bake for 20 more minutes.
  5. Allow the bars to cool completely.
  6. Dust the bars with powdered sugar and slice into squares.

A note on the rosewater and food coloring: this is what makes these bars reminiscent of Turkish delight, but it is optional if you just want plain lemon bars. If you’re not fond of the flavor of rosewater, you can leave it out but still dye the bars pink so they at least look like Turkish delight.

As for the powdered sugar: Dust on as much as you want! Turkish delight is usually quite well covered in powdered sugar, so this is another element that really ties in the Narnia theme.

I hope you enjoy this enchanting treat!

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Mrs. Beaver’s Orange Rolls – A Narnia Recipe

Mrs. Beaver's Orange Rolls - A Narnia Recipe

And when they had finished the fish Mrs. Beaver brought unexpectedly out of the oven a great and gloriously sticky marmalade roll, steaming hot…”

-The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe-

I have tried and failed a bunch of times to make a traditional English (er, Narnian) marmalade roll. Each time I tried, the roll turned out so hideously ugly that I couldn’t bring myself to photograph it. On top of that, I realized that I don’t like orange marmalade. It’s too bitter for my taste. But I was not willing to give up on this concept, since the sticky marmalade roll described in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe just sounded delightful.

So, I decided to take an interpretive approach to this recipe. I kept the sticky roll concept and even included orange as a flavor, but I went with a more American recipe: orange cinnamon rolls! I’ve always loved orange rolls, but have never tried making them from scratch. I used this orange roll recipe and added cinnamon to it. So good! I do think this is something the Pevensie children would have enjoyed eating while sitting around Mr. and Mrs. Beaver’s cozy dinner table.

Mrs. Beaver’s Orange Rolls

Ingredients

For the dough

  • 1 packet active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 cup warm milk
  • 1/4 cup shortening
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 egg
  • 3 1/2 cups flour (more may be needed, see directions for details)

For the filling

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 4 Tablespoons cinnamon
  • 2 Tablespoons orange zest
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted

For the glaze

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 4 teaspoons melted butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange extract
  • 4 teaspoons milk

Directions

  1. Dissolve the yeast in the water.
  2. Add the milk, shortening, sugar, salt, egg, and flour.
  3. Beat the ingredients together until it forms a smooth dough. If the dough is too sticky or wet, you may need to add a little bit more flour, but only add a little bit at a time.
  4. Knead the dough for about 7 minutes until it is smooth and elastic.
  5. Place the dough in a greased bowl and allow it to rise for about an hour.
  6. Divide the dough into two pieces, and roll each piece out into a rectangle.
  7. In a small bowl, combine the sugar, cinnamon, and orange zest for the filling.
  8. Brush each dough rectangle with melted butter, then sprinkle the cinnamon sugar filling on top.
  9. Roll the dough up length-wise, and cut each roll into pieces that are about 2 inches wide. I use unflavored dental floss to do this.
  10. Place the rolls into a greased baking pan.
  11. Cover the rolls loosely and let them rise for about 45 minutes.
  12. Bake the rolls at 375 degrees F for about 20 minutes.
  13. Mix together the glaze ingredients.
  14. Pour the glaze over the rolls, and serve warm.

 

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The White Witch’s Hot Drink – A Narnia Recipe

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White Witch's Hot Drink - A Narnia Recipe

Edmund felt much better as he began to sip the hot drink. It was something he had never tasted before, very sweet and foamy and creamy, and it warmed him right down to his toes.

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

 

This month, everyone at Fandom Foodies is celebrating #Witchtober, in which we create recipes inspired by our favorite fiction witches. Though she’s not really a typical “Halloween-style” witch, my favorite fiction witch is The White Witch from The Chronicles of Narnia. She is beautiful, powerful, and totally evil.

In The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, there is an iconic scene in which Edmund encounters The White Witch on his first trip to Narnia. Trying to trick him into trusting her, she offers him something hot to drink to warm him up. In the movie adaptation, this drink is hot chocolate, but I like the idea in the book that this is a totally new and different drink. It seems more enchanting that way.

While reading the description of the drink quoted above, I tried to create a hot drink that met all those qualities. Sweet=sugar, of course. Foamy and creamy=milk. When I read that it “warmed him right down to his toes,” I thought of warm spices like cinnamon. So, combining all those elements, I came up with a recipe for hot spiced milk.

This drink was definitely, sweet, foamy, creamy, warming, and delicious! Even before I drank it, it filled the room with a wonderful aroma. I could definitely see myself using this drink to warm up in the middle of a snow storm. Enjoy, and happy #Witchtober!

 

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a saucepan on the stove.
  2. Heat on medium, stirring frequently, until the mixture is foamy.
  3. Pour into a mug and enjoy.
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Rustic Bread Recipe – For Fantasy Feasts

rustic bread recipe

This recipe today is not based off of any specific story, but an overall genre: fantasy! Fantasy is definitely my favorite genre in books, movies, and even video games. In pretty much every fantasy food scene, you’ll see some type of rustic bread. So, to help round out your fantasy feasts, I made some rustic bread! I adapted this crusty homemade bread recipe, and it turned out awesome.

As you can see from the photo, this bread works best when you tear off chunks rather than slicing it. Serve it with your favorite meats and cheeses, or just slather it with butter and jam. The possibilities are endless!

Rustic Bread Recipe - For Fantasy Feasts

Ingredients

  • 1 envelope rapid rise yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups warm water
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the ingredients together in a large bowl.

  2. Leave the dough in the bowl, and allow it to rise for 1 hour.

  3. Punch the dough down and form it into a ball shape.

  4. Place the dough ball onto a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat.

  5. Cover the dough loosely with a towel, and allow it to rise for another hour.

  6. Cut a slit in the top of the dough ball with a sharp knife.

  7. Cover the dough loosely with aluminum foil, and bake at 425 degrees F for 25 minutes.

  8. Remove the foil, and bake for 25 minutes more, or until the bread is a deep golden brown color.

 

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Cock-a-Leekie Soup – A Narnia Recipe

 

Narnian cock-a-leekie soup

The meal — which I suppose we must call dinner, though it was nearer tea time — was cock-a-leekie soup, and hot roast turkey, and a steamed pudding, and roast chestnuts, and as much fruit as you could eat.

-The Silver Chair

In The Silver Chair, the children, along with Puddleglum the Marshwiggle, become hopelessly lost in their quest to find the prince. They are tired and freezing cold when they find the House of Harfang, which they soon discover is a royal court filled with giants. The giant king and queen take them in and give them warm clothes and a hot meal, including cock-a-leekie soup.

Pole, Scrubb, and Puddleglum are super creeped out by these giants, even though they are being nice, and it turns out they have good reason to be creeped out, as the giants are not as nice as they seem! Still, the soup seemed hearty and comforting, so I wanted to recreate it.

Outside of the Narnia books, I had never heard of cock-a-leekie soup before, and I actually had no idea what it even was. So, I did some research and found out that cock-a-leekie soup is a traditional Scottish dish made of chicken and leeks (hence the name). Before making this soup, I had never purchased or cooked leeks before in my life. I don’t even think I had ever eaten leeks before, though it’s possible I have and just didn’t realize it or don’t remember. Either way, this was a new and interesting experience for me!

Cock-a-leekie soup is traditionally thickened with rice or barley. I love barley in soup, but I couldn’t find any barley in the store I normally shop at. I had rice at home, but I have a strong aversion to rice in soup (the reasons for which I will not get into on this blog!). In my research, I did find one source that stated potatoes could be used in place of barley or rice, so I went with that.

Traditionally, cock-a-leekie soup also contains prunes, but my sources say that it is acceptable to leave them out, and I went with that because prunes are gross 😉 .

This soup was rather unique and very enjoyable. I look forward to making it again when I can get my hands on some barley.

Cock-a-Leekie Soup - A Narnia Recipe

Cock-A-Leekie Soup – A Narnia Recipe

Ingredients

  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and diced
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 1 large potato, peeled and diced
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • 3 bone-in chicken thighs (or 4 bone-in chicken drumsticks)
  • 1 leek, sliced (see bottom of page for more info)
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper
  • 1 tsp. dried parsley

Directions

  1. Place the chicken stock, carrot, celery, potato, onion, and chicken in a large pot, cover the pot, and cook on medium-high heat for 30 minutes.
  2. Remove the chicken from the pot, remove the meat from the bones, and place the chicken meat back into the pot. Discard the bones.
  3. Add the leeks, salt, pepper, and parsley to the pot.
  4. Cook for 30 more minutes on medium heat.

For anyone like me who has never cooked with leeks before, here’s how to slice a leek: Cut the bottom root off the leek (about 1/2 inch off the white bottom). Cut about half of the green part of the leek off the top. Discard the roots and the tops of the leaves. Wash the leek well, as it may have dirt in the little crevices. Slice the remaining parts of the leek, white parts and green parts. The white part of the leek resembles an onion both in taste and appearance.

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Mrs. Beaver’s Homemade Bread – A Chronicles of Narnia Recipe

Mrs. Beaver's Homemade Bread - A Chronicles of Narnia Recipe

One of the most quaint little scenes in The Chronicles of Narnia is when the Pevensie children are invited into the home of Mr. and Mrs. Beaver. Mrs. Beaver cooks them all a delicious dinner, and even packs up some food for them to take on their journey.

One of the foods she packs is a loaf of homemade bread, which she later uses to make ham sandwiches on the road. I love crusty homemade breads more than practically anything, but I figured a bread with a softer crust would work better for ham sandwiches, so I found this recipe from King Arthur Flour and adapted it slightly. The butter gives the bread a nice flavor, and the milk helps to make the crust softer. Perfect for sandwiches!

Mrs. Beaver’s Homemade Bread – A Chronicles of Narnia Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup warm milk
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 envelope instant yeast

Directions

  1. Mix all the ingredients together in the bowl of an electric mixer.
  2. Use the dough hook attachment to knead the dough for about 10 minutes, or until it forms a smooth consistency.
  3. Grease the bowl, and allow the dough to sit in a warm place until it has doubled in size.
  4. Shape the dough into a loaf form. I do this by rolling it out into a rectangle with a rolling pin, then rolling up the rectangle length-wise. Then, I pinch the edges closed and fold them underneath the loaf and place it seam-side down into a loaf pan.
  5. Allow the dough to rise once more, again to about double in size.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 30 minutes, or until the crust turns golden brown.

If you’ve never made homemade bread before, don’t be intimidated! Here are the three most important things to remember:

Water/Milk Temperature

The liquid should be warm, but not hot. Too cold, and the yeast will not activate. Too hot, and the yeast will die. Think of the temperature of bath water. This is the perfect temperature for bread making.

Amount of Flour

Add the flour 1/2 cup at a time if you’re unsure how much you need. The dough should come together nicely without being sticky. If it’s sticky, just keep slowly adding flour until it reaches a good consistency.

Kneading

Kneading helps form the chewy texture you find in good bread. If you have a dough hook attachment on a mixer, that works perfectly. If not, there are tons of tutorials online for how to hand knead bread dough. It’s actually kind of fun!

 

I hope you enjoy this process as much as you enjoy eating the final product. Homemade bread is one of life’s simple joys, and I think that’s something Mrs. Beaver knew a lot about.

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Narnian Oatcake Recipe – The Chronicles of Narnia

narnian oatcakes

Oatcakes show up a lot in The Chronicles of Narnia. They are often eaten as traveling food, which makes sense since this oatcake recipe makes cakes that are hearty but also sturdy. When I saw oatcakes mentioned in The Last Battle, I knew I wanted to recreate them.

I turned to The Official Narnia Cookbook. This book has loads of delicious recipes. Some of them are directly from the books, and others are simply inspired by certain scenes or characters.

The cookbook has two different oatcake recipes: one using a yeast dough, and one using a quick dough, almost like cookie dough. I went with the yeast-free kind this time because it sounded easier, quicker, and tastier. Win win win. I’ll save the yeast oatcake recipe for another time.

Narnian Oatcake Recipe – The Chronicles of Narnia

Adapted from The Official Narnia Cookbook

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 3/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 cup quick oats
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 6 Tbsp. butter, room temperature
  • 4 Tbsp. milk

Directions

  1. Mix together the dry ingredients.
  2. Cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it forms a crumbly mixture.
  3. Add the milk and mix well.
  4. Grab 2 or 3 Tablespoons of the dough and roll it into a ball. Flatten the ball onto a cookie sheet as flat as you can get it.
  5. Repeat with the remaining dough until you run out.
  6. Bake the cakes at 400 degrees F for 10 minutes, or until golden brown.

These oatcakes are so good! Nutty and a little bit sweet, they’re perfect for any kind of meal. They can be eaten with honey and jam, or you can take it a more savory route and pair this oatcake recipe with butter and cheese. I also like to just eat them plain like cookies.

 

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission for any sales made through those links. Rest assured, this costs you nothing extra!

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Soft Caramel Recipe – The Chronicles of Narnia

In The Magician’s Nephew, Polly and Digory are on a quest in Narnia and are desperate for something to eat for dinner. The only thing they have available is a bag of toffees in Polly’s coat pocket. They eat all of them but one, and they plant the final toffee in the ground to grow a toffee tree. More on that later 🙂

“The little paper bag was very squashy and sticky…it was more a question of tearing the bag off the toffees than of getting the toffees out of the bag. Some grown-ups (you know how fussy they can be about that sort of thing) would rather have gone without supper altogether than eaten those toffees.”

-The Magician’s Nephew-

One of my favorite things about C.S. Lewis’ writing in The Chronicles of Narnia is how he talks about grown ups. It cracks me up and makes me realize that I am still a kid at heart. Toffee is delicious, even if it is “squashy and sticky.”

The way this toffee is described, it sounds more like caramel than toffee to me. Most toffee recipes produce a hard, crunchy candy. I love hard and crunchy toffee, but it is more difficult to make, as it requires a candy thermometer and can be easily burned. Plus, a soft caramel recipe would be more authentic in this situation, I think. So, that’s what I did.

I adapted this soft caramel recipe from Creme de la Crumb, and it did not disappoint!

soft caramel recipe

Soft Caramel Recipe – The Chronicles of Narnia

Ingredients

  • 10 Tbsp. butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 Tbsp. light corn syrup
  • 1 can (14 oz) sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Directions

  1. Combine the butter and the sugar in a saucepan, and stir it until the combination is melted and incorporated together.
  2. Add the corn syrup and the sweetened condensed milk. Whisk the ingredients together until the mixture boils.
  3. Lower the heat to medium-low, and whisk the mixture constantly for about 10 minutes. The mixture should be bubbling softly the whole time. You’ll know when to take it off the heat when it turns a golden brown color and starts to pull away from the sides of the pan.
  4. Add the vanilla and pour the mixture into a pan lined with parchment paper.
  5. Allow the caramels to cool completely.
  6. When the caramels set, cut them into squares and wrap them in pieces of wax paper.

This soft caramel recipe produces candies that are buttery and sweet and definitely squashy and sticky. Perfect for growing a toffee tree!

 

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission from sales made through those links. Rest assured, this does not cost you any extra money!

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